Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Several years ago, on a blustery, frigid Martin Luther King Day, a group of Forsyth students, parents, faculty and staff took a walk in our neighborhood to visit Graham Chapel at Washington University and the Missouri History Research Library, formerly United Hebrew temple.  Dr. King spoke to huge audiences at both places in 1957 and 1960, respectively, and my intent was to help the children see that Martin Luther King, Jr., one of the greatest figures in human history, was a person different in no important way from each of us.  He walked on streets where we have walked, and he met and tried to help people we know.  He did what we all must do--accept responsibility for the future—and he demonstrated that each of us have the capacity to be a potent social and moral influence. 

Throughout this week, Forsyth teachers used morning meetings, read-alouds and social studies times to discuss one of Dr. King’s consistent messages: regardless of our color or religion or nationality, we are called to help our fellow man even when it might be a difficult, troubling thing.  Dr. King had a name for this way of doing things.  He called it “a kind of dangerous unselfishness.” It’s a way of being that threatens all forms of cruelty, and unfairness, and jealousy and small-mindedness.  Every one of us bears the power to direct a peaceful and prosperous future, and at Forsyth we believe that teaching children empathy and courage is every bit as important as geometry and grammar.

[All-School Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration >> On Friday, January 15, 2016, a windy, cold afternoon, the whole School – Pre-K – Grade 6 – gathered on Falcon Field, hands joined, to sing several songs in honor of this great man and the message of peace and understanding that he shared. See photos.]

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